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Great Books Primer: This course is an introductory survey of the West covering the literature of the Jews, Greeks, Romans, Christians, and the Modern Age, using the Traditio Nostra Curriculum. It is a theology, philosophy, and literature Socratic Discussion course. Readings are no more than a few pages and the discussions are specifically crafted for younger students (6th–7th grade).  The class format is that of a "great books" seminar—students read primary works from the great authors and authoresses of Western Civilization and then discuss them in a round-table format, thus joining what has been referred to as the "Great Conversation." 

Great Books 1: This course covers the three great, ancient contributors to the West: the Hebrews, the Greeks, and the Romans. It combines philosophy, theology, and literature readings, and is intended for 7th–9th grade students. The class format is that of a "great books" seminar--students read primary works from the great authors of Western Civilization and then discuss them in a round-table format, thus joining what has been referred to as the "Great Conversation."  The course uses our own Traditio Nostra curriculum.

Great Books 2: This cycle covers the great age of synthesis: from the coming of our Lord to the Renaissance. It combines philosophy, theology, and literature readings, and is intended for 7th–9th grade students. The class format is that of a "great books" seminar--students read primary works from the great authors of Western Civilization and then discuss them in a round-table format, thus joining what has been referred to as the "Great Conversation."  The course uses our own Traditio Nostra curriculum.

Great Books 3: This cycle covers from the beginning of the Enlightenment to the Present.  It combines philosophy, theology, and literature readings, and is intended for 7th–9th grade students. The class format is that of a "great books" seminar--students read primary works from the great authors of Western Civilization and then discuss them in a round-table format, thus joining what has been referred to as the "Great Conversation."  The course uses our own Traditio Nostra curriculum.

Great Books 5: This course covers the great age of synthesis; from the birth of our Lord to the Renaissance.  It combines philosophy, theology, and literature readingsThe advanced level of the class means the students will read more freely and with fewer topical restraints, and the course is intended for 10th–12th grade students. The class format is that of a "great books" seminar--students read primary works from the great authors of Western Civilization and then discuss them in a round-table format, thus joining what has been referred to as the "Great Conversation." The course uses our own Traditio Nostra curriculum.